‘Dries or Die’ with New Patterns

I took some of my new dry flies for some “dries or die” spins.

The size 30 CDC Midge Emerger worked like a charm. Purple got looks, but black received many takes. The Renegade did well sporadically, but, mostly at choppy water. And, smaller fish really liked the “Hi-Viz” Griffith’s Gnat.

A tough fish to catch was a 14″ rainbow, to which I cast over and over for probably a good 30 minutes. Set the hook too early the first take, but after a few minutes, the fish again sipped bugs. And, I kept at it. Finally, it took a second time.

I had a great time catching a load of brookies. They are beautiful and fight their hearts out.

 
The biggest fish thus far for me on a dry is this one.

Football. 12" girth, 17" length. #driesordie #dryfly #flyfishing #orvis

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What a fat fish! An online calculator estimates it at 3.1 lbs. A large Elk Hair Caddis duped it.

Also memorable was this good-sized brookie that fought a lot harder than it looks. I didn’t measure it, as it jumped out of the net once I unhooked it. Maybe 10″?

But, even better: a good-sized wild brookie. #nofilter #flyfishing #dryfly #orvis

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With the sun bright and the fish educated, it is a great time to get out there.

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2 thoughts on “‘Dries or Die’ with New Patterns

  1. Do you bend the hook to offset the point to increase hooking percentages? How the heck do you tie it onto your tippet?? I assume you weren’t fishing it blind.

    1. Are you asking about the size 30 emerger? If so, I make it on the Gamakatsu C12-BM hook:

      • I don’t bend the hook. It’s super-sharp, has a wide gape and is very thin. The only trick is when you fish the fly downstream. I have to remember to wait a second for the fish to take the fly and turn its head before setting the hook
      • It is a “big eye” hook, so that really helps

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